A relationship of trust and confidence between members of the Sheriff’s Office and the community they serve is essential to effective law enforcement. Law Enforcement Officers must be free to exercise their best judgment, and to initiate law enforcement action in a reasonable, lawful and impartial manner, without fear of reprisal. So, too, enforcers of the law have a special obligation to respect the rights of all persons. The Monterey County Sheriff’s Office acknowledges its responsibility to establish a system of complaint and disciplinary procedures which not only subject the officer to corrective action when he conducts himself improperly, but also will protect him from unwarranted criticism when he discharges his duties properly. It is the purpose of these procedures to provide a prompt, just, open and expeditious disposition of complaints regarding the conduct of members and employees of the Office.

To this end, Monterey County Sheriff’s Office welcomes from citizens of the community constructive criticism of the Department and valid complaints against its members and procedures.

WILL SOMEONE LISTEN TO MY COMPLAINT?
Yes, they will. We want to find out if something went wrong so we can see that it does not happen again.
IS THE SHERIFF’S OFFICE OUT LOOKING FOR COMPLAINTS?
No, we are not. A complaint could mean that someone has not done a good enough job. However, we do want to know when our service needs to be improved or corrected.
DOES A COMPLAINT HAVE TO BE MADE IN PERSON?
No. We prefer to talk to a complainant in person, but we will accept a written complaint or a telephone call. Persons making complaints will be personally interviewed by an investigator during the investigation.
WILL THE SHERIFF BE AWARE OF A CITIZEN’S COMPLAINT?
Yes, he will. The Sheriff gets copies of all complaints against Deputy Sheriff’s. Each of the deputies’ superiors is also notified.
WHO CAN A PERSON GO TO, TO MAKE A COMPLAINT?
Any member of the Sheriff’s Office can take a complaint. The information will be delivered to the Professional Standards section where an investigation will be initiated.
WHO INVESTIGATES A CITIZEN’S COMPLAINT?
An investigator from the Professional Standards section or a supervisor designated by the Sheriff.
CAN A PERSON UNDER THE AGE OF EIGHTEEN MAKE A COMPLAINT?
Yes. Bring one parent, a guardian, or a responsible adult with you.
ARE COMPLAINTS INVESTIGATED THOROUGHLY?
Very thoroughly. We want to find out where we went wrong. By the same token, if a person makes a false complaint, we want to find out and take appropriate legal action.
CAN SOMEONE GET INTO TROUBLE FOR COMPLAINING?
Not if they have been truthful. We would not and could not bring charges against a person who has acted in good faith.
WHAT WILL HAPPEN TO THE OFFICER?
That depends on what he did. If his actions were improper, he will be disciplined by the Sheriff. If his actions were criminal, he will be dealt with like any other citizen.
WILL THE PERSON COMPLAINING BE TOLD HOW THE COMPLAINT CAME OUT?
Yes. Each complainant will receive a letter from the Sheriff’s Office telling them the disposition of the investigation.
WHAT ABOUT THE POLYGRAPH?
In certain cases, where we cannot find the truth any other way, the complainant may be asked to take a polygraph examination. The same is true for our deputies. Our goal at the Monterey County Sheriff’s Office is that you will never need to use the information contained in this folder.

– Please contact a Crime Prevention Specialist assigned to your area:

– If you live in the unincorporated areas of Salinas, Spreckles, and the North County communities of Aromas, Castroville, Las Lomas, Moss landing, Prunedale, Pajaro, or areas south of Salinas to the San Luis Obispo county line, email Dave Crozier or call him at (831) 759-6675.

– If you live in Carmel Valley, unincorporated areas of Carmel and the Monterey Peninsula, Pebble Beach, and Big Suremail Donna Galletti or call her at (831) 647-7909.

– Or, contact the Sheriff’s Office at (831) 755-3700.

– To start the Neighborhood Watch Program in your neighborhood contact a Crime Prevention Specialist.

– If you live in the unincorporated areas of Salinas, Spreckles, and the North County communities of Aromas, Castroville, Las Lomas, Moss landing, Prunedale, Pajaro, or areas south of Salinas to the San Luis Obispo county line, email Dave Crozier or call him at (831) 759-6675.

– If you live in Carmel Valley, unincorporated areas of Carmel and the Monterey Peninsula, Pebble Beach, and Big Suremail Donna Galletti or call her at (831) 647-7909.

– You may leave an anonymous tip using our Online Crime Tips form.

– You may call our anonymous tip line at (888) 833-4TIP (4847).

– Applicant fingerprinting is currently provided at the main office, 1414 Natividad Road, Salinas.

– Yes. Applicant fingerprinting is provided Monday through Friday, excluding holidays, every 15 minutes starting at 8:30 AM through 4:00 PM. Please call 755-3700 to schedule an appointment.

– Yes. The Office charges a rolling fee of $25.00. All other fees are determined by agency or organization requirements.

– Individuals applying for a peace officer position in California are required to meet several statewide minimum standards for employment. The Monterey County Sheriff’s Office standards include:

  • No felony convictions
  • Meeting the citizenship requirement (included are provisions for permanent resident aliens)
  • Minimum age of 20 1/2 years
  • Minimum education of United States high school graduation or passage of GED test
  • Successfully pass a Written Exam and Physical Ability Exam (Required T-Score of 50 or above)
  • A fingerprint and criminal history check
  • An employment interview
  • A background investigation indicating the individual is of good moral character
  • A medical and psychological suitability examination

– Local law enforcement departments may set higher standards than the statewide minimum standards. Where there are no statewide minimum standards, the local hiring authority may set a standard, e.g. vision and hearing standards. This is why some standards vary from department to department. Visit www.post.ca.gov for more detailed information.

– For all city police officers, county sheriff deputies, and most other peace officer categories, the Regular Basic Course is the minimum entry-level training requirement. Exceptions to this would be peace officers employed by certain specialized law enforcement agencies, coroner peace officers, Reserve Level II or Level III officers, and limited function officers. To determine the minimum training requirement for the categories listed as exceptions, please contact the hiring agency or view the on-line POST Administrative Manual, section B (regulations) at www.post.ca.gov. Regulation 1005 specifies the minimum training standard for full-time peace officers and Regulation 1007 specifies the minimum training standard for each level of Reserve peace officer.

– This varies with every agency. Some agencies will only hire individuals after they have graduated from a Basic Academy (regular basic course), while others will hire individuals and send them through an academy as trainees or cadets. Some agencies require that an individual attend the agency’s Basic Academy regardless of previous completion of another Basic Academy. Monterey County Sheriff’s Office will provide/pay for Academy attendance if you haven’t completed a POST Basic Academy. We also accept Certificates of Completion from other Academies.

– California POST does not have reciprocity with other states, nor do we have a challenge process. California POST has a Basic Course Waiver (BCW) process for individuals who want to become California peace officers and have completed at least 664 hours of general law enforcement training (including a general law enforcement basic course of at least 200 hours), and have at least one year of successful sworn general law enforcement experience. The BCW is a 4-step process that includes: self-assessment/application; POST evaluation; written and skills testing; and issuance of a waiver letter. Once the BCW process is successfully completed, the applicant receives a waiver of the California Regular Basic Course; however, acceptance of the waiver is at the discretion of the employing agency. Visit www.post.ca.gov.

– Yes, however, not everyone is accepted. Every individual applying to a Basic Academy must complete a criminal history clearance. If the criminal history reveals a felony conviction, you will not be allowed to enroll in the course. Many academies administer a reading and writing test to determine the likelihood of succeeding in the training, however, it does not preclude enrollment.

– A list of training institutions approved to present the POST-certified Regular Basic Course is provided in the Employment Data for California Law Enforcement or the Catalog of Certified Courses publications. From this list you may select the institution(s) of interest and contact the training presenter to obtain information on costs and enrollment. To accommodate different working schedules, the Regular Basic Course is presented in several formats. The Intensive Format is usually a Monday-Friday schedule and during normal working hours. The Extended Format is usually evenings and weekends. The course is also presented in a modular format. Completion of Reserve Level III, II, and I modules (in that order) is the equivalent of completing the Regular Basic Course.

Visit our web site at www.montereysheriff.org/jobs for a complete employment opportunity listing, call Human Resources at (831) 755-5118 or visit http://agency.governmentjobs.com/montereycounty/default.cfm for additional Monterey County employment opportunities.

– RECRUITS: Are “at-will” employees. Recruits are sworn in as Deputy Sheriffs upon graduation from the P.O.S.T. Academy. Failure to graduate or to meet the Sheriff’s Office standards is cause for release from this position.

– DEPUTY SHERIFF: Twelve (12) months.

– PROFESSIONAL STAFF: Nine (9) months.

– The Basic Certificate is awarded as defined in Commission Procedure F-1-5 to currently full-time peace officers of a POST participating agency who have satisfactorily completed the prerequisite Basic Course requirement and the employing agency’s probationary period. Visit www.post.ca.gov for more information.

– You will need to successfully complete the 136-hour minimum POST Requalification Course to requalify your training. Six-Year Exception: If you completed a Basic Course after July 1, 1999, you may complete the requalification course one time only. If you do not become employed in a position that requires the Basic Course within six years of your academy completion, you will need to repeat the entire Basic Course.

– You must submit a copy of your DD214 Form along with a completed Monterey County Application for Veteran’s Preference. 

Human Resources at (831) 755-5118.